Who leaves the lights on when people are trying to sleep…no person with a functioning internal clock. When the lights go out, people normally are coaxed into falling asleep by their body. You would expect the same for a red eye flight. Well, it took a very long time until the lights were finally out. I think at most we probably got three hours of sleep, and I could feel it

IMG_8225 when we were starting our descent. I was tired, my eyes hurt, and I was ready for a whole day of sleep…but the beautiful sight outside my window dismissed all feelings of tiredness.

The mountainous coast merged into sandy beaches and lush wetlands–a sight to remember. Especially the volcano peaks visible from my window seat. Landing in San Salvador, we were surprised by humidity and warmth. Though so welcoming, it was almost too warm especially when driving in a van that had no air conditioning.

Our friends and guides from Asosación Mangle welcomed us with a MIIS sign, quick introductions, and loading the two microbuses. We stored most of our luggage on top of the van I was in, the one without AC 🙂 No problem, on the road we simply opened all our windows and enjoyed the cool breeze.

To Salvadorians we were probably driving pretty fast…a speedy 80 km/hr (~50mi/hr). There are barely any cars on the roads, but lots of coconut vendors and street vendors. San Salvador is a busy city. Old school buses are the regular buses.

bus

We drove past the Palace, US embassy (a huge complex) while getting yelled at by a police officer on a bike not to take pictures, and then it was off to Ataco (our destination for the evening).

Ataco es muy bonita. It’s an old, yet well keep touristy city with a few thousand inhabitants. Beautiful murals decorate almost every building in the city. We had dinner at “Time Square Restaurant”, though it has an american name, we enjoyed typical Spanish food.

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